Author: Nicola Cooper

Transforming Cyber Week Transactions Into Loyal Customers by Defining the Problem and the Solution

Cyber Week, the now weeklong, global sales period seeded from Black Friday, is upon us. But looking at the headlines, it’s clear something’s awry with the shopper experience. Consumer group Which? has been warning consumers to do their research ahead of Cyber Week after it emerged that nearly nine in 10 deals available last year had been cheaper at other times.

Even where the discounts are real, the issue with Cyber Week is that, for the most part, it is a very transactional affair. A shopper chooses to buy purely based on the brand that offers the lowest price - it’s a race to the bottom. Moreover, should the customer then go on to find the same product at a lower price elsewhere, or worse still, from the same brand, it leaves a bitter taste in the mouth.

So how do brands solve this clear CX issue taking place? This was the question a cohort of marketers gathered for at the most recent Maxymiser Customer User Forum in London to answer. Here we share their insights into defining both the problem and solution to realise a brand’s CX goals during Cyber Week and beyond as well as key CX learnings from a luxury car brand.

Defining the problem

When asked about his approach to problem-solving, Albert Einstein is famously purported to have said, “If I had only one hour to save the world, I would spend fifty-five minutes defining the problem, and only five minutes finding the solution.”

 

What he’s really alluding to is that whether we are marketers solving a CX problem or not, it’s vital to take a step back. We must frame the challenge to understand why something is being changed. In the context of a marketing problem, it’s the only way to make sure you serve the customer what they need when they need it. 

This requires getting into the shoes of the consumer, explained Jack Westwood, Principal Consultant, EMEA, “Customer journey mapping is an invaluable tool for visually illustrating the processes, needs and perceptions throughout a customer’s interactions and relationship with the brand. Most importantly, it can help you identify the ‘moment that matters’ – the moment a customer decides if they will or won’t buy – that is often the keystone for driving change.”

While customer journey mapping is a lengthy process with five constituent parts. To understand the problem, marketing teams must put the first two into practice;

  1. Creating an initial plan- about building out personas. Understanding the pages they visit
  2. Evaluate- the attitudes and sense check them. Work out and prioritise the moments that matter for the consumer

Putting journey mapping into practice

A great use case for gathering marketing teams together in this way can be found in the automotive sector. Why? According to Luth Research, there are over 900 interactions that take place between the very first interaction a consumer has with an auto brand and the purchase.

For Mercedes then, solving a customer experience issue arising with millennial shoppers was no mean feat. In particular, the team had begun to notice a trend in this younger audience whereby they were arriving onto the Mercedes site before bouncing off within a matter of seconds.

Building out the persona of this shopper, they explored the journey that was leading many to the website. It was clear that an ongoing TV campaign was working very effectively to capture their interest in low monthly repayments on a Mercedes, but upon arriving to the site, the full costs they were presented with alarmed them.

This was the moment that mattered. 

Defining the solution

In this instance, it was the product team that addressed the challenge. Mercedes decided to introduce its first ever compact car - the CLA - to be advertised at the sub-$30,000 sweet spot for entry-level luxury cars.

Bringing this new proposition to millennial market in the right places at the right time relied on a cross-channel solution. But what do we mean by ‘cross-channel’? Putting the term through Google there are over 90 million results.

Franco Loos, Managing Consultant, EMEA, explains the leap marketers have to make from multi-channel marketing to cross-channel is much like fielding a football team, “for many marketers carrying out multi-channel campaigns it’s like captaining a team but none of them talk to each other, you have 11 players who all want to score goals. They don’t want to pass the ball - they don’t want to share.”

Getting your marketing channels talking to one another in a coordinated way hinges teams need to focus on the latter three stages identified by Jack Westwood; 

  1. Explore- what the customer needs at these moments, KPIs of changing
  2. Brainstorm- what’s the journey that we want to take them on? All the different teams that work with you are involved
  3. Design the new experience- build a CX hypothesis with a new, cross-channel approach 

At Mercedes, a new journey was mapped entirely around the moment the customer lands on the website. The solution saw the marketing team build an entirely new microsite devoted to the shared experiences of millennial CLA owners. Alongside this, a Superbowl advert was developed to raise awareness among this target group, en masse, with a clear call-to-action to visit the microsite and find out more for themselves.

The net effect was not only a hugely successful new car launch, but Mercedes had also managed to expand the overall lifetime value of their customer. A fantastic achievement that future proofs the brand for years to come.

So how can we apply this to those brands tacking Cyber Week? There’s an infinite number of ways the consumer can interact with your brand before they purchase and even post-purchase. What is important to remember is that when brands work in silos, they cut these all-important connectors and end up with a poor customer experience. 

So whether you max out on sales this Cyber Week or not, take the time to assess whether your business is joining the touchpoints together to create a seamless experience. It will determine not only next year’s sales, but the performance you see through 2019.

As marketers, are we meeting our customers' expectations during the holiday season? Are we providing them the experience they expect? We asked more than 400 marketers to critique our profession's holiday season performance. The answers are revealing, candid and funny. Get your copy of the comic book here.

 

Transforming Cyber Week Transactions Into Loyal Customers by Defining the Problem and the Solution

Cyber Week, the now weeklong, global sales period seeded from Black Friday, is upon us. But looking at the headlines, it’s clear something’s awry with the shopper experience. Consumer group Which? has been warning consumers to do their research ahead of Cyber Week after it emerged that nearly nine in 10 deals available last year had been cheaper at other times.

Even where the discounts are real, the issue with Cyber Week is that, for the most part, it is a very transactional affair. A shopper chooses to buy purely based on the brand that offers the lowest price - it’s a race to the bottom. Moreover, should the customer then go on to find the same product at a lower price elsewhere, or worse still, from the same brand, it leaves a bitter taste in the mouth.

So how do brands solve this clear CX issue taking place? This was the question a cohort of marketers gathered for at the most recent Maxymiser Customer User Forum in London to answer. Here we share their insights into defining both the problem and solution to realise a brand’s CX goals during Cyber Week and beyond as well as key CX learnings from a luxury car brand.

Defining the problem

When asked about his approach to problem-solving, Albert Einstein is famously purported to have said, “If I had only one hour to save the world, I would spend fifty-five minutes defining the problem, and only five minutes finding the solution.”

 

What he’s really alluding to is that whether we are marketers solving a CX problem or not, it’s vital to take a step back. We must frame the challenge to understand why something is being changed. In the context of a marketing problem, it’s the only way to make sure you serve the customer what they need when they need it. 

This requires getting into the shoes of the consumer, explained Jack Westwood, Principal Consultant, EMEA, “Customer journey mapping is an invaluable tool for visually illustrating the processes, needs and perceptions throughout a customer’s interactions and relationship with the brand. Most importantly, it can help you identify the ‘moment that matters’ – the moment a customer decides if they will or won’t buy – that is often the keystone for driving change.”

While customer journey mapping is a lengthy process with five constituent parts. To understand the problem, marketing teams must put the first two into practice;

  1. Creating an initial plan- about building out personas. Understanding the pages they visit
  2. Evaluate- the attitudes and sense check them. Work out and prioritise the moments that matter for the consumer

Putting journey mapping into practice

A great use case for gathering marketing teams together in this way can be found in the automotive sector. Why? According to Luth Research, there are over 900 interactions that take place between the very first interaction a consumer has with an auto brand and the purchase.

For Mercedes then, solving a customer experience issue arising with millennial shoppers was no mean feat. In particular, the team had begun to notice a trend in this younger audience whereby they were arriving onto the Mercedes site before bouncing off within a matter of seconds.

Building out the persona of this shopper, they explored the journey that was leading many to the website. It was clear that an ongoing TV campaign was working very effectively to capture their interest in low monthly repayments on a Mercedes, but upon arriving to the site, the full costs they were presented with alarmed them.

This was the moment that mattered. 

Defining the solution

In this instance, it was the product team that addressed the challenge. Mercedes decided to introduce its first ever compact car - the CLA - to be advertised at the sub-$30,000 sweet spot for entry-level luxury cars.

Bringing this new proposition to millennial market in the right places at the right time relied on a cross-channel solution. But what do we mean by ‘cross-channel’? Putting the term through Google there are over 90 million results.

Franco Loos, Managing Consultant, EMEA, explains the leap marketers have to make from multi-channel marketing to cross-channel is much like fielding a football team, “for many marketers carrying out multi-channel campaigns it’s like captaining a team but none of them talk to each other, you have 11 players who all want to score goals. They don’t want to pass the ball - they don’t want to share.”

Getting your marketing channels talking to one another in a coordinated way hinges teams need to focus on the latter three stages identified by Jack Westwood; 

  1. Explore- what the customer needs at these moments, KPIs of changing
  2. Brainstorm- what’s the journey that we want to take them on? All the different teams that work with you are involved
  3. Design the new experience- build a CX hypothesis with a new, cross-channel approach 

At Mercedes, a new journey was mapped entirely around the moment the customer lands on the website. The solution saw the marketing team build an entirely new microsite devoted to the shared experiences of millennial CLA owners. Alongside this, a Superbowl advert was developed to raise awareness among this target group, en masse, with a clear call-to-action to visit the microsite and find out more for themselves.

The net effect was not only a hugely successful new car launch, but Mercedes had also managed to expand the overall lifetime value of their customer. A fantastic achievement that future proofs the brand for years to come.

So how can we apply this to those brands tacking Cyber Week? There’s an infinite number of ways the consumer can interact with your brand before they purchase and even post-purchase. What is important to remember is that when brands work in silos, they cut these all-important connectors and end up with a poor customer experience. 

So whether you max out on sales this Cyber Week or not, take the time to assess whether your business is joining the touchpoints together to create a seamless experience. It will determine not only next year’s sales, but the performance you see through 2019.

As marketers, are we meeting our customers' expectations during the holiday season? Are we providing them the experience they expect? We asked more than 400 marketers to critique our profession's holiday season performance. The answers are revealing, candid and funny. Get your copy of the comic book here.

 

A Journey From the Centre of the Inbox; Marketers Must Begin Crossing the Channels

Email is facing some challenges. Not only have subscriber bases taken a knock with the arrival of GDPR, cutting up to 50% of the contact list for some brands, but the annual volume of email is expected to rise from 269 billion to 333 billion by 2022.

Put simply, those that remain on the subscriber list will be inundated with brand content. Currently 49% of the emails that reach the inbox of the consumer are already being deleted before being opened. And now that will only increase.

Fortunately, email isn’t always the answer. Take the in-store scenario. A shopper using a click-and-collect service more than likely hasn’t printed – or remembered to bring with them – the printed copy of the order receipt. In this situation they might look for it in their inbox, but the reception in a shopping centre leaves much to be desired. In this situation, they remember an SMS they were sent alongside the order confirmation. 

In its simplest form, this is cross-channel marketing. The customer has been engaged post-purchase through both email and SMS. Of course, in today’s digital age, this represents just a drop in the ocean of ways to engage and guide consumers on their journey. 

Successfully orchestrating the cross-channel customer journey formed the centre of conversation at the latest Oracle Responsys User Forum, held in the illustrious Bulgari Hotel in Knightsbridge. Here, we cover some of the most important takeaways from a morning of insight and shared experiences.

Creating a full marketing journey

The main challenge when approaching cross-channel marketing is there are an infinite number of ways the consumer can interact with your brand before they purchase - and then again even post-purchase. As marketers we’re trying to join the points together to create a seamless experience. 

When brands work in silos, they cut the connectors which results in a poor customer experience. As Simon Johnston, Strategic Consultant, EMEA, surmised, “It’s like you’re fielding a football team but none of them talk to each other. Rather than one cohesive group working together, you end up with 11 players who all want to score goals. They don’t want to pass the ball; they don’t want to share.”

This carries significant consequences for the end user experience. Say the consumer sees an ad for a local gym, they visit the physical location and signup while there. On their return home, they open up Facebook and see an ad offering a discount off the joining fee. The online cookie is still working but the customer converted offline. The channels aren’t talking to one another.

Getting your marketing channels talking to one another in a coordinated way hinges on vital ingredients;

  • A customer journey canvas that’s going to explain how each of the channels will function
  • Permissions to enable effective data collection and storage
  • A plan for connecting customer IDs in anonymous channels such as cookies to known channels like SMS
  • The budget to invest adequately into the new channels
  • A structure free of silos to ensure everyone on board is working as one effective team 
  • Finally, reporting and attribution, it’s no good doing all this is we can’t prove the impact

Customer journey mapping

For most, elements of the above ingredient list will resonate with how they are set up currently or how they are looking to build. However, the very first ingredient requires time and thought marketers rarely enjoy. 

Knowing where to start your customer journey canvas was the focus for KimBarlow, Director of Strategic & Analytical Services EMEA, who started by breaking this down into five distinct areas;

  1. Creating an initial plan - building out customer personas and understanding what they visit
  2. Evaluate - the attitudes and sense check them. Do you want to change any attitudes?
  3. Explore - examining the capabilities of the organisation to interact
  4. Brainstorm - what’s the journey that we want to take them on? All the different teams that work with you are involved
  5. Designing the new experience – build a CX hypothesis with these new, different channels

Putting this into practice, Kim drew on an example from GE. Doug Dietz, an industrial designer working for GE healthcare had one particular problem – children who have to have an MRI scan found the process scary. From the doctor’s appointment, to arrival at the hospital and waiting rooms, by the time they reached the MRI room, they were so anxious they often burst into tears and in struggling to stay still, made the process of taking the scans much longer than necessary. 

Not only are the costs of hiring extra staff to support the process a huge driver of change, but also the side effects of often resorting to using drugs to calm the children and allow the machine to take accurate images.

Kim explained, “It’s about finding the moment that matters. For Sophia, this is the moment that she sees the MRI ‘monster’. Solving any kind of problem when customer journey mapping relies on asking “What gets the target audience excited?’ If you’re asking questions like this, you’re focusing on the needs which are always the key to changing their behaviours.”

In Doug’s case, the team realised kids care about exploration, adventure and being outdoors – this sparked an entire rejuvenation of the customer journey centred around the concept of going camping. The new roadmap was centred on maintaining this concept at every point in the child’s journey from doctor’s appointment, through to the MRI room itself, fully decked out as a campsite.

Kim concluded, “Data can give you lots of indicators, but it’s about understanding the attitudes that you want to influence. Consumers are humans at the end of the day. Once you’ve thought about the emotional journey, then you can start testing. Start small and build around the experiences that work.”

Make sure to also check out our Cross-Channel Fundamentals Guide and Streamline CX Guide here.

Collision Course; Marketing Can’t Achieve Customer Centricity On Its Own

For marketers and customer service professionals, customer experience has always sat at the very core of their role in driving greater value for organisations. However, according to the Harvey Nash/KPMG CIO Survey, the recent surge in adoption of AI and chatbot technologies means some 60% of UK CIOs report leadership teams are now also looking at IT for support. 

Of course, to keep customers happy and loyal, all organisations need to figure out how they can keep up with the customer experience standards set by industry disrupters – and make the necessary internal changes to ensure it happens sooner rather than later. Where marketers and customer success teams might once have assumed ownership of the customer experience, they are now expected to share it, and play well with other departments being brought into the mix.

So what does this mean? Ultimately customer experience (CX) has always been at the centre of the organisation. What’s changing is its practitioners. In today’s market, CX practitioners come from all different parts of the business and must work cohesively to ensure the outcome is a seamless journey through on and offline channels.

Delivering this invites challenges not only in how teams are restructured and realigned with each other, but also how the wider organisation understands its purpose as a business and reports on its performance as such. Here we consider some of the chief barriers facing organisations looking to drive greater value through enhancing the customer experience.

Competing priorities

According to the recent report published by the CX Network on the Global State of Customer Experience, competing business priorities are now the number one challenge for customer experience practitioners when it comes to increasing the customer-centricity of their organisations.

Sales, for example, is a traditional area where sparks might fly with one team focused solely on short term financial results and the other looking at longer term trends and customer satisfaction. Crucially, this is no longer the age of the seller – with the birth of assistance technologies, the required mindset is one of guidance. 

Equally, where IT might have seen its role as simply to ‘keep the lights on’, it is now an integral part of creating one, single record of all interactions between a brand and a customer that now range from online to social media, from customer support to chatbot. 

Senior buy-in

Another second key challenge identified by CX Network in keeping customer experience on top of the agenda is a lack of buy-in from the top to the bottom. With that is a lack of understanding from senior internal stakeholders in regards to their responsibility and impact on the customer experience. 

Customer experience is the responsibility of everyone within the company. Getting CEO level support to involve everyone from the initial start of a CX programme is key to cultivate companywide customer centricity, bringing everyone on board to share a common understanding. 

Rip and replace

With senior leadership buy-in, the route map for customer centricity can be drawn in any conceivable way. Importantly, rather than embarking on a rip-and-replace mission, it is important decision makers understand how CX can complement the current culture to enhance the business’s competitive edge. 

After all, the unique identity of a company is often crucial to its success. But, the culture does indeed need to accommodate to customer expectations, aligning to actually fulfil feedback where possible. This change must be driven from the top and rooted in the awareness of the value of CX – how it benefits client loyalty and the bottom line.

The CX and ROI relationship

Another perceived barrier is the absence of connecting the CX programme to tangible and measurable business results. Having clearly defined objectives and tying them to business results are key to keep CX a high priority initiative. 

However, treating people only as rational actors where information, clicks and purchases are the only currencies of a brand interaction will likely not end well. 

Instead, viewing every step of the customer journey as an opportunity to strengthen a mutually beneficial partnership, and designing the experience to trigger positive emotions, will endear customers and the people they happily recommend to the brand. 

As an added benefit, a more fully human approach can boost the job satisfaction of everyone on the brand side as well, making stars of brand managers who understand the need to engage people more fully as human beings

It is up to customer experience practitioners to disband outdated roles to ensure marketing, sales and IT align to, with, for, and around the customer. Balancing the flexibility of practitioners to deliver positive emotions, rather than hard results, with the need for sustainable, profitable change around the customer is a fine line. Go too far and the initiative falls down, but executed well, the business levels the playing field with market disruptors.

Check out our free guide to streamlining your customer experience. Discover how top-notch customer experience can help you move away from a short-lived, campaign-centric approach: 

 

Customer Journey Mapping: The Cornerstone of Cross-Channel Marketing

Marketers understand the key to successful business is cross-channel marketing as it makes it easy for customers to complete any desired activity on whatever medium they are most comfortable with.

However, the actual implementation of cross-channel marketing is a different story. In fact, for many, communications are still siloed and these brands are missing out on a 43x uplift in marketing performance and lead generation from cross-marketing efforts. 

Artwork Simon Heath drew at the event to visually summarize the presentations.

The latest Eloqua Customer User Forum tackled this very subject, hearing from Oracle Marketing Cloud experts on how to successfully expand cross-channel marketing to drive real results.

Kim Barlow, director of strategic & analytical services EMEA, opened the day by discussing why cross-channel marketing is just as important for B2B brands as B2C ones. She stressed that “the success of a cross-channel strategy relies on a strong customer journey map.”

So, what is customer journey mapping and why is it so important? Put simply, it is a powerful tool that teaches brands about their customers. It visually illustrates customers’ processes, needs and perceptions throughout their interactions and relationship with a brand. It tells a story about the potential frustrations and experiences of customers.

You may find the idea of starting a customer journey map intimidating. It is certainly an eye-opening process, and there is some time investment required. However, if you  follow this process you can be truly effective:

  1. Create an initial map that includes personas, behaviors, touchpoints, attitudes, emotions, and enablers.
  2. Evaluate these attitudes, prioritize the focus and biggest pain point. Then determine the impact.
  3. Explore and clarify needs and drivers and examine your capabilities (roles and processes).
  4. Brainstorm the desired transformation and innovation.
  5. Design a new experience. Before going full steam ahead, do a reality check before designing the experience.

Ultimately, customer journey mapping puts the customer in the bull’s eye of a marketer’s thinking and demonstrates the need for the entire brand to adapt. However, to truly impact the customer experience, learnings from customer journey mapping must be taken and implemented. This will ensure cross-channel marketing efforts reach consumers effectively with the message in the right place at the right time.

With that in mind, there are three key takeaways to ensure true success:

  1. Cross-channel strategies are only effective when the customer journey for different personas are mapped out (data analytics is key).
  2. Customer journey mapping should be optimized continuously so marketers are giving the best experience to prospects and prospective customers.
  3. Each touchpoint needs to have a KPI that matches to the overall objective and is measurable where possible.

Two Questions that Lay the Foundation for Effective Cross-Channel Marketing

Cross-channel marketing has moved beyond the hype to become a reality for marketers. In fact, it’s the new normal. Why? Our online behaviors have evolved – consumers are constantly checking emails, social media apps, and even interacting online via voice technology. To reach them effectively, a marketer must have the message in the right place at the right time.

However, setting up cross-channel marketing isn’t easy – especially when defining what the marketing strategy will be. If marketers aren’t prepared, or poorly set up as a team, budget and time will simply be wasted with no positive impact on the revenue or customer satisfaction.

To ensure this doesn’t happen, there are two fundamental questions marketers need to ask themselves. If they cannot answer these successfully, all the other processes or changes they put in place simply won’t be effective and cross-channel marketing won’t happen.

1. Has Your Marketing Team Shifted its Mindset?

Historically, when marketers need to launch a campaign or communicate with their customers, they look at each channel separately and consider how, when, and what content to use. This mindset needs to shift entirely. Marketers need to consider the entire buyer journey and how channels ought to work together to create a consistent experience. Only then will they be able to design campaigns that will capture attention.

2. Are You Clear on Your Entire Multichannel Marketing Approach?

Marketers need to be 100 percent clear on every stage of the cross-channel approach to ensure it will work effectively. So, take a step back and interrogate the plan. Does your team all agree on how to define cross-channel marketing? Does your team all agree on where it starts? How many channels are included and how will your cross-channel marketing efforts be measured?  

Once marketers can answer these questions and have entire team singing from the same hymn sheet, they will be ready to tackle the barriers to cross-channel marketing.

First and foremost, this involves breaking down silos. This is one of the biggest challenges for any brand. Different teams are responsible for social media, ecommerce, contact centers, etc. and usually, each team has a different focus, a different way of collecting and analyzing data, and different processes to reach desired outcomes.

The other biggest barrier to being able to achieve a single view of the customer is technology limitations. Stories abound of external providers who don’t understand their client’s business model and data, or take on a technology implementation project that’s either too big or not big enough.

Regardless of the hurdles to overcome, cross-channel marketing is happening and the choice marketers have is how effective their brand can be in achieving it. Only with buy-in from the entire team do marketers have the strong foundation they need to ensure customers are engaged, building loyalty and generating revenue.

Putting Dynamic Back into Email Design

While it may surprise those who view emails as an antiquated channel of communication, emails are still a crucial part of the way brands communicate with consumers. Just consider that in 2017, global email users amounted to 3.7 billion people, and, this figure is set to grow to 4.3 billion in 2022.

While this sounds conclusive, in practice, email marketing remains a hotbed of discussion with marketers divided on one question: Is the content or design more important?

The first email was sent in 1971. Back then, content ruled supreme. But over 37 years, emails have evolved to offering greater scope for marketers. Today, we want to focus on design. This isn’t just about finding the right images and colors for the message, but rather the opportunity to be fully interactive, enhance product engagement and have the look and feel of an app.

So how do marketers achieve that? It is by understanding that neither content nor design is more important. The performance of both is intrinsically linked to data. Only informative, relevant content together with engaging design will keep a customer’s attention. And whether it be an image change, text change or module change, data can now determine exactly how the customer interaction takes place.

Making the Leap

In 2018, email design is all about dynamic content.

Imagine an email campaign that automatically adapts based on the known interests of each subscriber. That is dynamic content. It is an advanced personalization technique, which uses data held within each subscriber’s profile to automatically display content more closely aligned with their known interests or preferences.

The key is aggregated data that can be pulled from email sign-up preferences, profiling subscribers or behavioral data. And dynamic content can be used in a wide range of applications. Either data-based design, including a CTA offering based on previous interactions, or using the nearest store location information or gender specific information. Or you could provide contextual content pulled from custom feeds, social networks, and website behavior. This information includes recent interactions, weather feeds, location, and customer persona.

Putting it into Action

This is all well and good, but you might be thinking, "We just don’t have time to create great designs and tap into dynamic content. We are always working to extremely tight deadlines.” The answer is templates and planning.

Modular email templates are the key to successful use of dynamic content. The template is a framework that includes a header and footer with several content modules. These content modules can be stacked and then removed, rearranged, and repeated in numerous configurations. Most importantly, they allow for design freedom without the need for extensive HTML knowledge.

As a first step, marketers should conduct an audit of previous email campaigns to see what works and how consumers reacted to design. Then, template the most commonly used modules and template dynamic content rules.

Ultimately, brands and marketers don’t have to compromise on email design to send a relevant, data-driven email. Why? Data drives design. It ensures that content is shown in the best possible way to different audiences. Relevant content increases familiarity and loyalty, which in turn, improves click through and conversion rates.

Want more?

Watch the webinar, Bridging the Gap: How to Orchestrate and Personalize the Entire Customer Experience, to learn how your organization can unify email and web orchestration with a strategy that will keep communications relevant and audiences engaged.

Watch the webinar today.

How Can Marketers Achieve Personalization in 2018?

Despite personalization being lauded as a best practice principle for years, many brands still struggle with the implementation. Recent research conducted by McKinsey revealed that just 40 percent of personalized messages actually feel personal to the recipient. This isn’t surprising as personalization is complex, and businesses are complex. Most importantly, brands are just at the starting gates of personalization.

However, any savvy marketer will agree that, in the age of the hyper-connected consumer, delivering a personalized experience is the key to bridging the gap that is growing between a customer’s expectations and the customer experience reality that brands can deliver.

With that in mind, many businesses have successfully set up the basic hygiene factors and dynamic profiling for personalization. In addition, they have been able to run a few campaigns. The challenge is now getting fully up and running and successfully maintaining personalization.

The latest Maxymiser Customer User Forum tackled this very subject of how to achieve personalization in 2018. Kate Loren, Consulting Services Manager, and Steven Coulomb, Consulting Services Manager, Oracle opened with this question, “Given we are all customers, why do marketers find personalization so hard?”

What we learned? As marketers, we think in segments and channels and want customers to generate revenue. As customers, we don’t care about segments and just want an easy and relevant experience.   

What it all boils down to is emotion and connection. In fact, a quote from American poet Maya Angelou sums it up well; "I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”

As customers continue to grow in digital maturity, the customer experience gap will get wider So, it is imperative to focus on how to achieve personalization now. And it is all about the ability to align people, data, and processes.

During the forum we heard from industry experts and speakers on how they have implemented personalization and aligned people, data, and processes. And here are some of the key lessons and out takes.

Abby Francis, Online Marketing Manager, Carphone Warehouse Online Solutions

  • Challenge yourself to make personalization something that drives ROI rather than just another marketing buzzword.
  • Some customers don’t want to know you are monitoring their behavior ,so you need to ensure the experience you create is natural.
  • Test small experiences to see the effect. If the results are positive, you can see the potential impact on the bottom line. If the results are negative, you can showcase the revenue saved by testing rather than conducting a formal roll out.

Terry Rydzynski, Head of Optimisation (CRO), Camelot

  • Reassess the current measurement model. Most businesses will have the measure learn loop model. Ask whether your business should evolve this or change it completely.
  • Build KPIs on a macro and micro level to ensure you are truly measuring all levels of personalization on the business.
  • Use GDPR as a reminder that marketers are responsible for delivering relevant content.

Abdul Hamid Ebrahim, Associate Director, Transformation Services, Oracle

  • Personalization cannot be truly successful unless it transforms the business. Change management is required. And start with the small ‘t – “Incremental improvements in an organization’s digital marketing efforts driven by the adoption of particular technologies that significantly impact the achievement of its goals.”
  • Whether you know it or not, your senior leadership is talking about personalization. So, take the chance to be proactive and engage wider business to get their buy in.

The forum ended with the question, “What are you most excited about over the next 12 months when it comes to personalization?” The answer really focused in on unlocking data and linking it together so you can truly see that personalization is making a tangible difference to the bottom line. To do that, success in a new era of personalization requires marketers’ to plan, structure, and align around the customer.

There is nothing more important than creating exceptional customer experience to help rebuild trust and build a strong brand reputation. Download Customer Experience Simplified: Deliver The Experience Your Customers Want to learn how to craft an outstanding experience for your customers​.

Customer Experience Simplified

3 Storytelling Tips for Marketers in the Age of Social

Humans love telling and hearing stories. From children’s nursery rhymes to week-long box-set binges. Stories define who we are and how we understand the world. And that is why storytelling is one of the most powerful ways to breathe life into a brand. It helps give products and services an identity.

Many think marketers have always been storytellers and that they truly understand what it takes to create an emotional, authentic connection in the stories they tell. Maybe, but the world of marketing and storytelling has entered a new era.

The traditional sales funnel has been circumvented by consumers’ use of social media channels to interact with brands. And social media and messaging services such as Snapchat and Instagram have risen to prominence in recent years, launching tools such as Instagram Stories.

Instagram launched Instagram Stories in August 2016. By the end of 2017 the service had in excess of 300 million daily users. An impressive metric that also explains how social has changed the pace and depth of storytelling and has become central to effective marketing in 2018. This new era of social storytelling means a brands’ fans and customers now get to engage with the company in a far more emotionally entertaining and informative way.

So, what are three simple steps marketers can take to tell their story and connect with their audience in this new world in a credible, interesting and believable way?

Focus on the Stories Fans Want to Hear

Brand marketing is no longer about long, general, anonymous stories about the company. Instead it is about quirky stories about the brand, about the people working in the company and about the customers.

For stories to stimulate strong feelings and inspire the imagination, there has to be a strong connection between the teller and the audience. Take the Gatorade campaign that offered a special filter that simulated Gatorade being poured onto your head (Gatorade baths are synonymous with winning.). The feature was popularized by tennis legend Serena Williams, and the campaign let fans experience the joy and have a ton of fun.This type of lively social storytelling helps set brands apart from their competition. The story has to be based in reality – and it also has to be delivered, or told, in a way that is entertaining, engaging and memorable.

Look for the Visual

Stories can be told in multiple visual and interactive ways, using new technology tools such as Snapchat Filters or Instagram Stories. This means that more often than not the focus is using imagery, video and interactive features to tell your story, instead of (too many) words.

For example, don’t forget about the value of b-roll content. If your story is set in a restaurant, you should mix in clips of people having dinner and the food to add context and depth to your social story and adventure. Offer consumers a visual layer of information that doesn’t need to be explained through words.

Authenticity Has Never Been More Important

Brands have long been judged on authenticity, but they have never found their stories so shoulder-to-shoulder with the likes of everyday people. With that in mind, brands should not waste time and effort in manufacturing a so-called authentic brand story. Instead look internally and invest in employees and empower them to share their stories.

Overall, remember to focus on the stories that your fans want to hear, and tell the best stories about the people and situation behind your company’s services and products. That way, you grab your audiences’ attention, provoke their interest and convert them to action.

Plug Social Media into Your Modern Marketing Machine.

7 Practical Building Blocks of a Strong Email Deliverability Strategy

Email marketing is a powerful way to connect with people with many marketers still counting it as their primary channel for lead generation. In fact, there are 658 billion emails sent worldwide a day and 7.6 million emails sent every second. However, how many of these emails are engaging, relevant and drive a CTA?

The latest Responsys customer User Forum tackled this very subject hearing from Oracle Marketing Cloud experts on email marketing in today’s environment. Kim Barlow, Director of Strategic & Analytical Services EMEA at Oracle opened the day by stating life is getting harder for the marketer as they strive to remain a legitimate brand that provides compelling content and a CTA, rather than settling for irrelevant bulk emails that hit the spam filter.

Creating email marketing content that successfully engages your audience is no mean feat. Especially when you consider one of the biggest challenges is deliverability. The process from launching a message to getting a customer’s inbox has significantly evolved over the past 10 years from batch and blast to hyper-personalisation.

“What is important is that over this time a marketer’s ability to reach prospects’ inboxes has become tied to reputation and engagement,” as Kevin Senne, Senior Director, Global Deliverability and Justin Crivelli, Senior Manager, Global Deliverability at Oracle shared.

And ISPs now play a crucial role in reputation. They are working hard to make the inbox a great experience and have an active role in protecting their customers from receiving unwanted or unsolicited emails. What is interesting is that each ISP has their own way of calculating what reputation means to them. However, if there is doubt about a brands reputation, this results in deliverability problems where ISPs can temporarily block emails. And this can take 2 – 3 weeks to resolve.

ISPs use a variety of tools to process and track all inbound emails – both on an IP and domain level. However, there are key factors ISPs look for when it comes to reputation and deliverability in the inbox:

  • They now look at a brand as a whole. So while your department may be doing the right job, another department may not and this will still damage your reputation

  • Key reputation indicators are spam traps, volume, complaints, bounces and engagement

  • When it comes calculating reputation, each IP address receives its own reputation and new IPs are treated with higher scrutiny due to lack of history and deliverability

  • Consistency is key as ISPs measure reputation over time

  • ISP’s factor in an individual recipient’s interactions like opens, clicks, scrolls, and filtering

While there is still no way to know what a brand’s specific reputation is at any ISP, we know that reputation measurement will continue to evolve. ISP’s like Google will put more and more data together including traffic from your website, SMS messages and social presence - Gmail recently allowed users to setup non-Google email addresses using IMAP.

So how do marketers achieve a good reputation and what are the practical building blocks of a strong deliverability strategy?

  1. Implement a rigorous and ongoing regimen of reviewing the quality of lists and databases. The biggest single contributor to deliverability success for this is the opt-in process which will exclude invalid email addresses and spam traps, qualifying new subscribers.

  2. Offer customers a preference centre to manage subscriptions to fine tune content of messages and prevent churn and email fatigue by offering frequency control options.

  3. Consistently review send patterns as a sudden increase in email volume could be an indicator that your mail server has been compromised by a spammer. 

  4. Focus on email design and structure. Always above the fold, every recipient should be able to answer the following three questions whether or not images are blocked - Who are you? What do you want me to do? Why should I do that?

  5. Less content, less size – more focus, more relevance. Keep your subject line between 35 to 50 characters long, avoid spam keywords and include 2 - 3 CTA’s in the email.

  6. Regularly monitor deliverability and audience engagement. Do not ignore engagement patterns in your base and monitor unique open rate by ISP, hard bounce rate, soft bounce rate, spam compliant rate and inbox placement rate.

  7. Test, test, test – the mantra of user-centric marketing.

In todays’ environment, marketers understand that they have 2 – 5 seconds before a customer decides if the email is relevant. As Markus Frank, Head of Strategic Services, DACH at Oracle concluded at the User Forum “Deliverability is all about whether you are a modern customer-centric marketer.”

Download this Email Deliverability Guide for Modern Marketers for more pro tips on orchestrating and delivering marketing messages that are relevant to individual preferences and behavior.