Tag Archives: Cross Channel Marketing

Why putting the business focus on experience pays off

Despite numerous articles and opinion pieces promoting the need for brands to adopt customer-centric commerce, the business realities and commercial pressures placed on retailers still mean that many are taking a purely conversion-centric approach.

As more brands make the shift into the digital space, it’s important to prevent tunnel vision when it comes to customer conversion and instead, find a balance between outcomes and customer experiences and help business to recognise that their conversion-centric approach is detrimental to their success.

According to recent research by Aberdeen Group, delivering a good digital experience can result in as much as a 15% uplift in customer retention rates, up to 7x improvement in annual company revenue and 6x improvement in customer satisfaction rates. Such stats have helped to convince marketers that – when used correctly - customer experience can be a powerful marketing tool, both helping to drive growth and bolster customer loyalty. In order to gain these benefits however, brands must first become more self-aware and more willing to embrace digital transformation.

One way to welcome this change and drive success in all areas is to think of experience as a transactional currency, from which both the brand and the customer can benefit. As competition blooms, brands need to understand that user experience is often a more powerful differentiator than price, as consumers gravitate to brands that adapt to their needs  . This loyalty, which in turn drives engagement, can be harnessed – using the right technology - for maximum benefit to both brands and customers.

This will become even more apparent once brands begin to harness their customers’ data, turning gained knowledge into tangible business outcomes. There is never a lack of data to garner; customer experience data is rich and almost limitless – often gaining even more value over long periods of time. Brands can use this information to consistently tweak and improve their path to purchase and move toward their goal of meeting a customer’s needs. By using this data to build personas of their customers, marketers can become experts in the customer groups that frequently interact with their brands.

Many of the brands embarking on the customer experience shift have already started to see positive outcomes. A company that has been successful in getting digital customer experience right, to transform its success, is the Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS). The company set itself the challenging task of trying to redefine its brand in the market, transforming from being a financial services provider to being an ‘experience business’ which works within the financial sector. This change in focus, away from products and towards customer experiences, has helped RBS provide a higher quality of service to its customers, ultimately building trust and loyalty in the long run. In the first week of using this technology, RBS saw a significant increase in click-through rate, and the agreement in principle completion went up by 10%. RBS has since been able to improve over one million journeys.

Success like this is not limited to any particular sector and can be achieved by any brand that is willing to modernise and understand how customers purchase within the digital realm. All businesses – regardless of the products they sell or the services they deliver – ultimately strive to modernise their practices and identify areas that can be optimised and improved. Optimisation allows brands to overcome difficult business challenges that stem from a lack of interaction with customers. This holistic approach takes into account all the aspects of online behaviour that may have previously been missed. Focusing on experience allows brands to gain an edge over their competition, using sophisticated metrics and complex data sets to reach their targets and drive success for many years to come.

Register for Modern Customer Experience 2018:

Whether you are looking for better ways to manage the full lifecycle of your B2C customers or you want to nurture B2B clients from first impression to customer advocacy, you won’t want to miss what Modern Customer Experience 2018 (ModernCX) has to offer. Join other marketing professionals, industry influencers, product experts and Oracle executives to learn how you can use the entire marketing ecosystem to impact the customer experience. 

Register for the event hereLooking forward 

3 steps to defining customer experience

2017 was the year that brands truly embraced ‘experience’, with Customer Experience, User Experience and even Brand Experience all becoming common terms within both the marketing and tech industries.

With so many different forms of experience, it’s easy to wonder whether marketers and brands really know the difference between them? How can they, when so many of us still struggle to even define ‘experience’ itself?

Officially, experience is defined as “the interaction between a subject and a stimulus that is influenced by personal interpretation.” The key part being ‘personal interpretation’ – the idea that experience is, by nature, a fluid and largely subjective notion, so it is no surprise that marketers struggle to define and perfect their customer experiences. What is considered an exceptional experience by one customer might be seen as average, or even poor, service by another. This is the problem with brands attempting to rigidly define their customer experiences, as the quality of the experience often relies on the mood of the customer, and not just the quality of a particular product or service.

While it seems impossible to predict exactly what a customers’ daily demands are, the development of Experience Analytics tools has made it increasingly possible to predict customer moods, improve their journeys, and ensure that the maximum number of people leave the shopping experience with a positive view that resonates with them.


With that in mind, here are three ways brands can begin making an impact and defining their experiences online:

Step #1: Build personas

Brands must start to accept that most of the interactions customers have with them are largely subjective. Both a customer’s fixed personality traits and changing moods can drastically influence the way that they perceive their experiences with a brand.

This means they must do their best to understand what a typical customer looks like, how they shop, and how they think. An understanding of the company’s target audience, converted into a detailed persona, will help tailor experiences to appeal to the majority of a brands’ shoppers. With geographic, demographic and even psychographic data, details as specific as optimum email distribution time, website navigations, and in-store display messages can be fine-tuned to maximise the experience of the end-customer.

Step #2: Think about online customer behaviour

Once an experience strategy has been devised based on the target audience, the next challenge lies in predicting specific shopping moods. Personalisation has previously offered a relatively useful response to fluid behaviours, but a more human approach is still required if brands are to take their experiences to the next level. By collecting real-time data, both on-site and in-store, brands can start to transition away from more traditional ecommerce metrics and begin to understand the more subtle aspects of customers’ online behaviour. These aspects can include everything from subtle cues such as mouse movements right through to eye-tracking and ‘rage clicks’ (frustratedly clicking on content over and over). These ‘Experience Analytics’ metrics are perfect for developing a much more in-depth and human understanding of customers.

Step #3: Develop guidelines

Brands have long-since offered guidelines outlining things like company colour schemes, fonts and logo usage rights. Now however, many customer experience experts have argued that brands must look to develop a new playbook, specifically for defining their brand experiences.

Insights stemming from customer behaviour profiling on websites, and in apps, can be used to create detailed guidelines helping to explain the feelings and behaviours that consumers should walk away with whenever they’ve interacted with a brand. 

By adopting the techniques outlined above, marketers, retailers and brands can ensure that they are providing the best possible customer services and experiences. By understanding the subjective nature of the experiences, they seek to develop, marketers can improve customer relationships, build loyalty, increase sales, and ultimately provide a better experience for both customers and brands.

Register for Modern Customer Experience 2018:

Join other marketing professionals, industry influencers, product experts and Oracle executives to learn how you can use the entire marketing ecosystem to impact customer experience. Ideal customers are still out there—learn how to identify and nurture them in Chicago.

Register for the event hereLooking forward to seeing you in Chicago!

For Cross Channel Marketing Success, Don’t Sit On Data; Act On It

I know, I know you have all the data you could ever need, blah, blah blah. And I know you know that ours is a cross channel world where a whole lot of us use multiple channels as we make our way to the checkout line - be it a real checkout line or of the digital/online variety. 

But for kicks and giggles let's look at how top performing brands handle use data. The chart below shows how top performing businesses use numerous activities to put insights − generated through reporting and analysis of data − into action. For example, they are 38% more likely to utilize the uni ed view of customer data to deliver omni-channel messages.

The finding comes directly from a recently released report from Aberdeen Group, Relationship One and Oracle Marketing Cloud which revealed the business value marketers derive by mastering orchestration of omni-channel marketing campaigns.

Optimize Accordingly 

Enabled with a unified view of customer insights, marketers can then optimize future campaigns accordingly. Specifically, this refers to tailoring the timing and content of each campaign based on insights captured through previous interactions. For example, if a high-tech buyer is more likely to respond to in-depth written content when making a purchase decision, knowing this insight would help the marketer use relevant content. The chart shows that Best-in-Class  firms are 81% more likely to have this capability in place, compared to others.

There is a lot of competition to capture customer attention and wallet share. Marketers who succeed do so by establishing a unique relationship with clients. One of the ways Best-in-Class firms do this is by using customer data to deliver informative, proactive communications (interactions that are initiated by the company, as opposed to the customer).

While facilitating customer spend and retaining clientele are top-of-mind for marketers, it’s important to remember that customer loyalty is closely related to brands becoming a trusted advisor to their buyers.

For example, a retail buyer being notified that an online order has been shipped is more likely to think of the retailer being engaged in addressing their needs, as opposed to another that’s not delivering such proactive notifications.

The Rest of the Story

Data is only part of cross channel marketing success. Download Digital Experience Management Through Marketing: Orchestrating Omni-Channel Conversations to learn other key parts of a successful cross channel marketing strategy. 

 

 

Why Retailers Need To Move Beyond Cross Channel Marketing

The retail marketing power has shifted for the marketer to the customer in recent years as digital has disrupted what we used to think of as tried and true retail practices. With the proliferation of channels beyond the store and the Web site, the way customers engage with your brand is on their terms.

With this shift comes the expectation that you make it easy for them to engage with your brand, when they want to, and how they want to, no matter where they are.

What should matter to retail marketers looking to survive in today’s tough, digitally transformed, retail landscape?

Stay Focused On the Right Thing  

The best-performing retailers, whether it is ModCloth, Amazon, or The North Face are not focusing on the marketing channels, but are focused on enabling seamless, low-friction customer experiences with their brands. The customer does not think about your brand in the terms of marketing channels.

They want to view your retail store as a window into the brand, but can access inventory and quickly and easily buy through their mobile device, or the website or even the store if they so choose.

They also want the product or service delivered to them quickly, no matter where they are, be it at home, work, a hotel on the road, etc. Retail marketers need to break down their siloed thinking and embrace that modern retail marketing success is driven by a seamless customer experience.

The Numbers Do Not Lie

This past December, Steve Olenski, Forbes contributor, influencer and Director of CMO Content & Strategy for Oracle Marketing Cloud shared the 4 Cross Channel Marketing Stats Marketers Need To Know Going Into 2017.

Read Steve’s post for sure but I’ll summarize the 4 stats here for you:

  1. Two-thirds of all shoppers regularly use more than one channel to make purchases. 
  2. The average shopper makes on average 9.5 visits to a retailer’s site before deciding to buy.
  3. Customers who shop on more than one channel have a 30% higher Lifetime Value than those who shop on only one.
  4. Only 5% of marketers say they are “very much set up to effectively orchestrate cross-channel marketing activities.”

It’s All About the CX

As I mentioned earlier the best brands in the world are not focused on marketing channels per se but the experience they provide across those channels.

Most marketers rate Customer Experience as a top priority for their organization year after year, but very few companies are actually able to deliver on their vision. How often do we hear stories of customers with open service tickets receiving an email promotion targeted towards “happy customers”? Or display ads shown promoting a product to a customer who just recently purchased that very same item?

When investigating where these customer experience initiatives fall flat - or even fail to get off the ground – it is very often see data issues at the root of the problem.

Marketers struggle with data silos within their own organization as they try to integrate customer data across multiple systems - email, web, commerce, service, loyalty, social, etc.

Even if they are able to successfully unite data across these systems, once customer start to move across devices and channels, most marketing systems lose track of who’s who. Add in the final component of anonymous audiences who move throughout the digital world, and the average marketer is facing an impossible task.

If you can’t be sure who you’re speaking to at the end of your marketing campaign, there’s no way you can provide a positive Customer Experience.

Keep It Simple

Retailers today need an all-in-one solution that helps retail marketers develop direct relationships with customers through seamlessly orchestrated cross-channel digital experiences—online and offline—that facilitate and strengthen customer interactions across a constantly growing list of digital touchpoints.

Watch this brief case study to see how one leading retailer uses Oracle Marketing Cloud technology and expertise to deliver a perfect customer experience that speaks to the mood and the moment of the consumer using cross-channel orchestration at this women's vintage fashion and lifestyle brand.

Image source: Pexels

3 Steps to Success in Omni-Channel Orchestration

Before I get to the aforementioned steps, if you're in marketing and are reading this and are not convinced the majority of people AKA consumers AKA your customers (yes this applies to you B2B marketers) use more than one channel to do pretty much everything — well, you may want to sit up take note of the world around you. 

Consumers today, on average, use six channels with nearly 50% regularly using more than four. In the US alone 98% switch between devices in the same day.  My assumption is that percentage is right around the same for the rest of the civilized world. Or very close to it. 

Blame our ever-growing ADD if you want but the point is we change marketing channels like we change channels on our TV. 

Business Value

A recently released report from Aberdeen GroupRelationship One and Oracle Marketing Cloud revealed the business value marketers derive by mastering orchestration of omni-channel marketing campaigns.

Here's the 3 steps to achieving success in our omni-channel world. 

1. Standardize Customer Data

Top performers standardize customer data throughout the business. In a world where ‘big data’ has become the new normal, marketers collect a wealth of structured and unstructured data. These come from multiple different channels (e.g., web, social media, email, in-store) and geographic locations. Structured data refers to data that is organized in a pre-de ned way or model. Examples would include data regarding a customer’s web visitation history or past purchases. Unstructured data refers to data that is not organized in a pre-de ned way or according to a standard model, such as text in social media messages, recordings of service calls to a contact center, images, etc. 

2. Don't Sit On Data. Act On It.

One of the most common mistakes companies make when launching and managing a Customer Experience program is assuming that collecting customer data is good enough to improve customer satisfaction and other measures, such as revenue growth. While some organizations might get lucky and see short-term results, those that achieve long-lasting performance improvements do more than just collect data. They analyze and act on it too. 

And so should you. 

3. Analyze Customer Feedback

In an environment where marketers use so many channels, it’s easy to get confused about how each channel contributes to marketing program results. One of the ways companies can ensure meeting customer needs is by capturing and analyzing customer behavioral and feedback data. This refers to data such as marketing campaign results (e.g., click-through rates, open rates and shopping cart abandonment rates) as well as survey data gleaned through methods such as online surveys.

Learn More

Download Digital Experience Management Through Marketing: Orchestrating Omni-Channel Conversations to learn more about the 3 steps to achieving success in our omni-channel world and about the business value marketers derive by mastering orchestration of omni-channel marketing campaigns. 

3 Steps to Success in Omni-Channel Orchestration

Before I get to the aforementioned steps, if you're in marketing and are reading this and are not convinced the majority of people AKA consumers AKA your customers (yes this applies to you B2B marketers) use more than one channel to do pretty much everything — well, you may want to sit up take note of the world around you. 

Consumers today, on average, use six channels with nearly 50% regularly using more than four. In the US alone 98% switch between devices in the same day.  My assumption is that percentage is right around the same for the rest of the civilized world. Or very close to it. 

Blame our ever-growing ADD if you want but the point is we change marketing channels like we change channels on our TV. 

Business Value

A recently released report from Aberdeen GroupRelationship One and Oracle Marketing Cloud revealed the business value marketers derive by mastering orchestration of omni-channel marketing campaigns.

Here's the 3 steps to achieving success in our omni-channel world. 

1. Standardize Customer Data

Top performers standardize customer data throughout the business. In a world where ‘big data’ has become the new normal, marketers collect a wealth of structured and unstructured data. These come from multiple different channels (e.g., web, social media, email, in-store) and geographic locations. Structured data refers to data that is organized in a pre-de ned way or model. Examples would include data regarding a customer’s web visitation history or past purchases. Unstructured data refers to data that is not organized in a pre-de ned way or according to a standard model, such as text in social media messages, recordings of service calls to a contact center, images, etc. 

2. Don't Sit On Data. Act On It.

One of the most common mistakes companies make when launching and managing a Customer Experience program is assuming that collecting customer data is good enough to improve customer satisfaction and other measures, such as revenue growth. While some organizations might get lucky and see short-term results, those that achieve long-lasting performance improvements do more than just collect data. They analyze and act on it too. 

And so should you. 

3. Analyze Customer Feedback

In an environment where marketers use so many channels, it’s easy to get confused about how each channel contributes to marketing program results. One of the ways companies can ensure meeting customer needs is by capturing and analyzing customer behavioral and feedback data. This refers to data such as marketing campaign results (e.g., click-through rates, open rates and shopping cart abandonment rates) as well as survey data gleaned through methods such as online surveys.

Learn More

Download Digital Experience Management Through Marketing: Orchestrating Omni-Channel Conversations to learn more about the 3 steps to achieving success in our omni-channel world and about the business value marketers derive by mastering orchestration of omni-channel marketing campaigns. 

Behold the Business Value of Omni-Channel Orchestration

If you think ours is not an omni-channel world, think again. The fact is we humans are using more and more channels to engage with everyone, including brands and marketers every single day.

Just consider these stats:

  • 15 years ago the average consumer typically used two touch-points when buying an item and only 7% regularly used more than four. Today consumers use an average of almost six touch-points with nearly 50% regularly using more than four. 
  • 98% of Americans switch between devices in the same day. 
  • 90% of customers expect consistent interactions across channels. 

The Good News, Bad News and Best In Class

The good news nearly 7 in 10 marketers deliver omni-channel conversations. The bad news is only 3 in 10 of these same marketers say they are either somewhat satisfied or fully satisfied with their ability to use data in marketing programs.

These findings come courtesy of Aberdeen Group, who in partnership with Relationship One and Oracle Marketing Cloud released an eBook which reveals the business value marketers derive by mastering orchestration of omni-channel marketing campaigns.

As for Best In Class, it should come as no surprise that the best marketers are nearly 40% more likely than others
to have established an infrastructure to deliver omni-channel customer conversations.

In other words, these 40% get it; they understand that consumers are using many channels to engage and interact and they know they better be prepared to deliver on the promise AND the expectation of a seamless, omni-channel experience.

Findings from Aberdeen’s CX study revealed that a leading group of organizations excel in managing customer experiences across digital channels such as email, web, mobile applications, and social media. Those are defined as ‘Best-in-Class’ businesses

Here’s how these 40% look in comparison to other brands AKA their competition.

Look at the disparities between best in class and all others. And pay very close attention to the chasm that exists when it comes to year-over-year change in annual company revenue.

While that looks like it’s only 39 percentage points different (6% to 45%) it is in fact a 650% difference between those marketers who excel in meeting customer expectations and all others.

You can choose to ignore that stat at your own peril.

Three Steps to Success in Omni-Channel Orchestration

The eBook identifies the three steps to success in omni-channel orchestration including the inherent and undeniable need to standardize customer data, which the aforementioned best in class marketers do before anything else.

Do yourself a favor and download Digital Experience Management Through Marketing: Orchestrating Omni-Channel Conversations because you didn’t realize it, omni-channel is now omni-present. 

Image source: Pexels

How Do You Create a Business Case to Prove the ROI of Your Cross Channel Marketing?

Gone are the days where the marketing department operated on a "wing and a prayer." Data is now available on every marketing tactic imaginable. That's good and bad. It's good because now ROI can be calculated more accurately to justify campaigns and shape future initiatives. However, it's also bad because there is literally so much information now available it can be a struggle to know how to sift through it all and compile the best data points to develop your business case for cross channel marketing efforts. Additionally, as more options are included in the cross channel marketing effort, the ability to analyze and assess the ROI can become complicated.

Here is a way to frame your justification for the cross channel marketing strategies you have selected for your organization.

Determine Success Factors and Quantify ROI

There are many types of ROI an organization can achieve. To build a compelling business case, you will need to know what type of return the organization expects. For example, your cross channel marketing objectives should reflect the desired success factors. The type of ROI might be an increase in sales (online, offline, or both) or loyalty, or it could focus on improved customer engagement and retention.

You may find these within the data analytics software you use. Disseminate them in your marketing plan. Once the ROI is specified, also include a quantitative amount for the ROI.

Frame the Case Around the Cross Channel Marketing Plan

What often happens is that marketers create a plan and execute on it but do not use it as the basis for presenting their results. While it may seem obvious, there can be a disconnect between the formal document and marketing team's actions. However, putting these together creates a compelling picture for your leadership team.

Put the specific objectives, messaging, and tactics in one column while another column has the data points that illustrate the result from each of those. It connects the dots and clearly shows whether or not you were on the right path with your marketing strategy. Additionally, it justifies your marketing budget by connecting each action to a measurable result — that's the ROI.

Gather All Data Metrics

Your business case will come from a number of data sources, especially since this involves a cross channel marketing strategy. This means collecting paid (search engine marketing, sponsorships, social media ads, etc.), earned (SEO, blogs, social media, etc.), and owned (page views, email, surveys, website visits, etc.) metrics. You will need to pull this data from many places. This includes any creative agencies you partner with on your cross-marketing program as well as your marketing systems, reports, and platforms.

Bringing all the data together into one place ensures you haven't forgotten any important information that could justify how well the cross channel marketing initiatives are working. The CEO and CFO are going to want to see evidence that what you are doing is working. Putting all data in one place can also illustrate to them how the initiatives are working across channels to drive greater results versus focusing on one channel.

Generate a Statistical Model with Software, Of Course

This is not something quickly made on graph paper. It requires the assistance of highly sophisticated modeling software. This technology can take all compiled data and distill it into a measurement score. This score is a number to use against the quantitative ROI you previously developed. Your leadership team will like seeing this number since they mostly work with that type of information versus the often intangible marketing results of the past. These scores will mean something to the CEO and CFO when you present them for your paid, earned, and owned tactics.

This also allows you to diversify your business case by presenting different perspectives on what the data means. This includes statistics about specific campaigns, audience segments, a marketing channel, and other filters. You'll be able to quickly compile a range of information and include it. This ensures you have provided the most comprehensive picture possible.

Deliver a Dashboard Visual to Clearly Present Your Business Case

The more clearly you draw a picture of those ROI results for your team, the better the reaction will be. That means developing a dashboard that is user-friendly for scanning the information and reaching a conclusion on what it means. Use numerous visual analytics to simplify the information.

Also, put details around specific areas that are important to your audience and that drive your case. This includes a progress-toward-goal approach related to financials, customers and leads, operations, and campaigns.

Takeaways

Keep in mind that everything you can build into your business case about the ROI will generate ongoing support. It may also assist with funding (and, perhaps more funding, if the results meet or exceed expectations). From there, momentum will result in more leads and sales and greater brand awareness. Other benefits include a higher rate of customer retention and increased ROI. These can also help you stay on top of any changes in preferences and behaviors. Responding to the shifts you find in the data can also speed how you pivot and maintain that expected ROI.

Proving the ROI of your Cross Channel Marketing doesn't end with your most recent success. Make sure you're staying on top of the best insights and inspiration, moving forward. Check out the 7th Annual Lookbook today!

7th Annual Lookbook

Image source: pixabay

5 Examples of Brands Using Cross-Channel Tactics to Drive Real Results

The goal of your cross-marketing strategy should be to tell all your audience and customers a similar brand story across multiple channels. However, you need do so in a slightly different way for each one while holding user engagement. Your story has to be slightly different for each channel due to the fact that people on those channels interact with these channels in unique ways.

That means you can't just blanket each channel with the same exact content. While one channel may work more effectively for video like social media, another channel is best suited by tips and lists of content that deliver helpful advice as found on a blog. Figure what works well where and you've got a winning cross-channel marketing strategy.

Still not sure? Here are five brands with winning cross-channel tactics:

  1. Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes-Benz has a cross-selling strategy that includes digital and social media channels, including paid media, owned media, earned media and content marketing. For example, its “Generation Benz” online community was integral in developing a customer profile for Mercedes Benz that would help them understand which marketing tactics would work best for each channel.

They determined that their campaign for their CLA model should include a traditional marketing tactic, which was a Super Bowl television ad with Usher and Kate Upton. This was also selected because the game was being played at a stadium they sponsored: The Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans. Additionally, they leveraged a microsite for that model and increased awareness across social media channels, including the #clatakethewheel campaign that targeted those in their early 20s to early 40s.

Additionally, Mercedes-Benz used paid Facebook ads, which was linked to video content also produced by the brand about the CLA model. In terms of earned media, they partnered with Casey Niestat, a known key influencer among the Millennial demographic, to cover that channel.

The result was the best product launch for the brand in 20 years, one million visitors viewed the CLA content online, and they had more visitors to their MBUSA.com website than at any other point in history. Additionally, they achieved an 82% conquest rate, which was the percentage of new buyers who had previously bought other luxury vehicle brands.

  2. Starbucks

Starbucks and their Frappuccino Happy Hour campaign is a good example of a cross-channel campaign that delivered results. Starbucks updated their website and released a television commercial in conjunction with the 10-day campaign. They used common imagery across all channels to tie together the various tactics and messaging style they used for it. They included other tactics like an in-app message to customers that encouraged users to text "WOOHOO" to find out what the brand had in store in terms of summer surprises they would be offering.

Starbucks continued to send out regular messages that were cross-promoting their "My Starbucks Rewards" program to get more people to sign-up and use this loyalty program. The brand also created their own social media identities for Starbucks Frappuccino from its regular Starbucks social presence. Both identities, however, worked to promote the Frappuccino Happy Hour campaign without just copying the content from each other.

The focus for success here is to pick something that is worth promoting, limit the time to create that exclusivity and demand to not miss the opportunity, and maintain consistency across channels like Starbucks did with consistent visuals but customized content and delivery mechanism.

  3. Heineken

In continuing the emphasis on consistency as a key success factor for cross-channel marketing, Heineken's Departure Roulette campaign provides a good benchmark of this factor. Heineken's campaign focused on an interactive video that provides the viewer with an opportunity to get involved. They see those who take part and play the game win an exotic vacation while those that opted not to take the challenge go home. The video was tied to a Web series called "Dropped," which furthers the idea that the best journeys in life are those that are spontaneous.

The cross-channel tactics included marketing this video on its website, YouTube channel, and other social media accounts like Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. The brand's logo and identity were clearly indicated alongside the video content but other than that the focus was on the visual engagement that the video offered that did not focus on beer or the brand. In this way, the marketing felt more about the user and less about selling them something. Yet, the user still connected the message of adventure and spontaneity with the brand that created the visuals and content.

  4. Land Rover

The luxury vehicle brand created a continuous brand experience with cross-channel marketing that included numerous Google-related channels, including using the Google Display Network, homepage masthead and Masthead in Lightbox ads on YouTube, and visibility through mobile, search and Google+. The brand also focused on digital campaigns that focused on voyages like its "Bred for Adventure" campaign. This cross-channel effort also included traditional tactics like television ads.

The campaign also included four different influencers who created visual content for their blogs and Land Rover's microsite. Each influencer took multi-day trips to places like Glacier National Park and the Appalachian Mountains. Land Rover also took visuals of the areas and included these on their website and ads, which provided consumers a way to check out the interior and exterior of their Discovery Sport model. Their cross-channel efforts resulted in 100 million impressions from the YouTube homepage masthead, 11 million more impressions on Masthead in Lightbox, and 10% increase in search ad CTR. Further results found that online leads from its digital channel efforts now account for 15% of the brand's total sales.

  5. Under Armour

Fitness brand, Under Armour, understands the need to create a cross-channel user experience. It combines its social presence, influencer marketing with admired athletes, and in-store content and interactive engagement with its “UA Shop”, a lifestyle-based custom shopping app and its Connected Fitness community.

The app delivers a personalized experience for customers collected from data on each customer, including their athlete inspiration, workout history, and previous purchase history. For example, its partnership with various apps helps to deliver data about what they are doing fitness-wise with their connected fitness tracker and geographical location. The result is that they receive specific product suggestions based on that data.

Other marketing tactics include the UA Play application, which allows users to scan barcodes across the store to learn about product details get other valuable content. This is a further way to connect the channels and draw the audience to all channels for a memorable experience. The result has been increased traffic and user engagement in their stores, on their website, apps, and social media platforms.

 

Lessons Learned

Cross-channel marketing success comes from consistency, interactive elements, and diverse content delivery systems. While everything digital rocks when it comes to marketing, these success stories also include in-store and traditional marketing tactics that extend the power of cross-marketing and touch customers and prospects in every way possible.

As demand for multi-channel campaign management grows, so do the options. Read this guide to learn how major industry players stack up against each other when rated for campaign management, advanced analytics, and digital marketing content capabilities.

Image credit: Pexels

A Marketer’s Guide to CrossFit Digital Channels

Like a competitive athlete trains to win by perfecting a balance of the optimum diet, exercise regime and mental focus, a CMO’s task is to develop a winning marketing machine. By coordinating every element to work together, the marketing machine will deliver short-term wins and outperform and outpace tough competitors.

The question is: what workout plan will sweat out inefficiencies, build the strongest muscles, and prepare a team for the highest performance level? The answer is a marketing workout plan that outlines a series of short but high-intensity and compound movements that are radically more effective at eliciting the desired cross-channel fitness result.

Essentially, we need a workout plan for cross-channel marketing as effective as CrossFit is for our bodies. But you can’t just jump right into full-blown CrossFit training—we have to be eased into it. Here I share with you a workout plan that will help you start strengthening your marketing channel muscles across channels.

1. Drill Your Demand Generation

Getting people excited about your company and product is hard work. Most marketers use a variety of materials and also recreate those materials every time they need to speak to an audience.

The first step to getting your cross-channel marketing in shape is taking an audit of what content, visuals and assets you currently have at your disposal. Think about how they can be reworked into new content to drive demand. Next, make sure that you actually sit down and map your content to the buyer journey. You need to ensure that everything you are creating focuses on the buyer’s needs.

2. Shape Up Sales Enablement

Tied to creating product demand is the need for companies to improve the effectiveness of sales enablement. Do this by first understanding the customer journey through all stages of the sales pipeline. Map your current sales resources along the pipeline stages, key verticals, buyer personas and differentiators. Understand the use case scenarios given by the sales team and analyze any bottlenecks preventing quick and efficient access to those materials. And ask your team to think about these questions:

3. Whip Partner Channels Into Shape
  • Does the format of your resource match the use case scenarios?
  • Are customer cases used during in-person or online customer presentations?
  • Are they mailed, emailed or simply referred to during online presentations?

The power of an extended sales team and a partner channel network cannot be underestimated. But companies need to do some things to make sure partners have access to relevant collateral.

Make all relevant resources easily available. Create relevant and engaging content for your channel partner sales team. Interview that team periodically to see what resources they’re using, which are effective and what would be beneficial to create. Make the most of your existing direct marketing and sales collateral. Edit, re-use and re-purpose webinars, eBooks, case studies and other collateral and modify your creative workflow to generate collateral for both direct and channel at the same time.

4. Workout For Website and Ecommerce

Websites and digital platforms are often the primary channels of customer engagement and need to be the core area of focus for marketing teams. But how?

Increase conversion for targeted industries by creating personalized landing pages based on the company’s industry, size and location. Implement a website personalization platform, such as DemandBase, to deliver personalized content to segmented visitors. Use consistent and attractive visuals throughout the website that support your copy to create an eye-catching web experience. Use dynamic content to further customize each visitor’s experience. Coordinate marketing and eCommerce operations for a cohesive omni-channel customer experience.

5. Condition Content Marketing

In a time when content marketing is a key driver of engagement, businesses are feeling overwhelmed by the amount of content they’re expected to build, distribute and track, all within tight timelines.

To streamline content production, content marketers need to get smart in their approach to stand out from the competition. This means investing in content strategy, aligning it with business goals, and setting up processes and platforms for effective content creation, re-use and distribution. Strategize and create a plan for content that includes measurable goals and aligns with business targets. Make content quality over quantity a priority. Edit, re-use and repurpose content across your entire organization and partner ecosystem. Track content usage and ROI and create a feedback look into the following year’s content planning.

7. Strengthening For Field and Event Marketing

Field marketers are in the trenches, often spending days or weeks away from their head office. Creating a balance between corporate strategy and real-world requirements is an arduous task. Keep a catalogue of approved and high-performing imagery from past events to quickly create campaigns for future events. Take what has worked will and create an “event-in-a-box” campaign. This reduces training and ensures contracted resources can self-serve and use the right assets and messaging without taxing your valuable field marketers.

8. Social Media Shakedown

Social media can be one of the most powerful tools in a marketer’s arsenal. From Twitter and Facebook to Instagram and Pinterest, all employees are online. But to get it right, companies have to put up-to-date collateral in the hands of employees.

Enable all employees, especially internal advocates, with easy access to approved on-brand shareable resources. If you’re managing your social engagement with Hootsuite, consider connecting content source SKD to your Hootsuite account, enabling any user to use pre-approved images, content and resources. Repurpose your content into visually impactful, bite-size, shareable resources. Create fact cards or slides from your best practice and eBook resources that are easy to share on social. Share your company’s involvement with non-profits and the community. Over time, tell the story of your culture or brand.

Equipment For Cross-Channel Marketing Fitness: Digital Asset Management

As you build strength, CrossFit routines will start to incorporate various kinds of exercise equipment: medicine ball, weight bench, pull-up bar. In cross-channel marketing, you also need equipment. One of the most valuable tools at the enterprise level is a digital asset management solution.

Digital asset management provides companies with a secure, central library for its media files, giving employees, partners and clients an effective way to locate, share and download their corporate digital assets, no matter where they are in the world. The future of digital asset management has arrived with integrations into other enterprise MarTech tools, such as Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Cloud, AutoCAD, Hootsuite, SharePoint and others. These integrations make sure that employees have quick and easy access to the rich media they need right from inside the tools they are already using to build out campaigns and marketing materials.

Poor customer service is unacceptable on any channel, including mobile. Download this brief, Cross Channel Orchestration Fundamentals to discover how you can deliver consistent customer service experiences and enhance customer loyalty.

Cross Channel Marketing