Tag Archives: Service Business

Getting Comfortable (and Effective) at Selling Your Product or Service

This week, we have some resources to help you actually Sell the Thing. Because you can create magnificent content all day long, pull together a wonderful audience, and produce a glorious product or service. But if you lack the skills to Sell the Thing, you don’t get the benefit of all that hard work. On
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10 Service Business Essentials that Help You Win Clients with Confidence

Here’s a scary thought: What if your content marketing actually works? What if you get all the clients you want? Will you be able to handle them? Those are important questions every service provider needs to answer honestly because there is often a disconnect between what we say we want and the actions we take.
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Join Us for a Live Workshop on Modern Email Marketing

The major heads-up today is that we have a live workshop next week (Tuesday, April 24 at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time) on how to use sophisticated segmentation and automation in your email marketing — even if you have a limited budget and you’re not particularly technical. This lets you create focused and relevant messages for
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It’s ‘Light the Fire’ Week on Copyblogger

We all have those times when we’re sort of coasting … gently floating along, letting things happen the way they will. But that time is not today. 🙂 This week, we’re fired up and ready to help you get (safely, sanely) out of your comfort zone and into some serious progress. On Monday, Stefanie Flaxman
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7 Unusual Signs on the Path to a Breakthrough

It’s easy to envision that other people’s paths (career or otherwise) are somehow smoother than yours. Have you ever had thoughts like that? Notions that everyone else who has some form of success achieved it by taking smart, consecutive steps that always led them forward, while you: Take two steps forward, one step back Stop
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Free Workshop *Today* on an Awesome New Content Tool

First things first: Brian Clark is co-hosting a free workshop today (in a few hours, at 12:00 p.m. Pacific Time / 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time), all about getting started with chatbots. If you don’t know much about chatbots, or even think they might be weird or creepy, check out my post from Monday explaining why
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‘No’ Is My Favorite Word

On your own, without any way to gauge whether or not your ideas are practical or wise, you might get carried away with your creativity. That’s why the word “no” is an essential part of the professional creative life. Hearing it helps me incorporate another perspective into my vision. I actually like hearing it so
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5 Elements that Build a Roster of Terrific Clients

"It isn't just ability that makes a writer successful — it's also wise positioning." – Sonia Simone

In the podcast episode I recorded recently with Seth Godin, we talked about storytelling — and he made a point I thought was fascinating.

Seth’s version of storytelling isn’t just crafting a plot in the traditional sense — the classic “The queen died, and then the king died of grief.”

He also looks at the implied stories in everything we do. We tell a business story with our tone of voice on a podcast, and the color choices on our website. Our pricing, our response time, our “Contact Me” form … they all come together to tell the story of your business.

Some businesses tell scary or ugly stories. A lot of businesses tell boring ones. Seth got me thinking about the elements that I believe tell a more inviting story for a writing business — the kind of story that attracts more clients and better revenue.

If you’re a professional writer, of course you need to write well. But it isn’t just ability that makes a writer successful — it’s also wise positioning. It’s the implied story that your business tells.

Here are my thoughts on five “story elements” that help writers attract the right clients, at the right pricing, in the right numbers.

Story element #1: your voice

For any business, but particularly for a writer, the voice of your marketing is one of the most important story elements you have.

What does that look like on your site today? Do you sound stiff and formal, or loose and conversational? Like tends to attract like, and the personality you put into your writing voice will tend to attract those qualities in your clients.

Do the choices you’re making invite the kinds of clients you want?

Ask yourself what qualities your writing voice is conveying:

  • Informally relaxed … or train wreck?
  • Reassuringly professional … or uptight?
  • Charmingly approachable … or sloppy?
  • Attentively detail-oriented … or nit-picky?
  • Creatively agile … or distracted?

These are always subjective. What might seem annoyingly uptight and controlling for me might feel appealingly detail-oriented to you.

Because you’re a pro, you have more control over your writing voice than regular people do. Use that skill to convey the kinds of qualities you want to see more of in your clients.

Story element #2: your site

Good copywriting clients today don’t just want wordsmiths — they also want content strategists. (Whether or not that’s the phrase they would use.) They want writers who understand how the web works today.

It’s hard to come across as informed and web-savvy when your site design looks 10 years out of date.

You don’t have to chase every design trend, but you do need your site to look current, uncluttered, and fresh.

As someone who would rather work with words than web design, my tool of choice for web design is a good-looking premium WordPress theme. And I’d make the same choice even if our company didn’t offer dozens of great ones.

They’re reliable, they’re easy to work with (particularly if you go with a solution like StudioPress Sites), and they offer a lot of professional design value for a modest investment.

Story element #3: your pricing

Price is one of the most powerful nonverbal elements of any business story.

  • American Express tells a different story from Visa
  • Châteauneuf-du-Pape tells a different story from Two-Buck Chuck
  • Mercedes tells a different story from Kia

Now, Visa, Two-Buck Chuck, and Kia are all things that a lot of consumers choose and even like.

But trust me, you do not want to be the Two-Buck Chuck of copywriting.

When you sell services, you sell your time. Hours of your life — the one thing you can never get any more of. Selling those hours at a discount just doesn’t make sense.

Of course, if you’re just starting out, you shouldn’t expect to command the same rates as an experienced writer. That’s why your first priority is to work very hard to get very, very good, so you spend as little time in “Two-Buck Chuck” territory as possible.

Crummy clients want cheap writers to produce generic CRaP that, truthfully, no one particularly wants to read anyway.

Great clients want professional writers to produce wonderful words that delight and serve their customers.

Two very different stories. The second one is much more fun.

Story element #4: your specialization

This is where a lot of smart writers start when they’re thinking about their positioning — and it’s a great story element.

None of us is good at everything. What are you great at? What could you become great at?

When I was a freelancer, I specialized in email newsletters, autoresponders, and other content that nurtured relationships with prospects.

I’m really good at that kind of writing. I have a lot of experience with it, which allows me to work efficiently. I enjoy doing it. And clients wanted it. It was easy for clients to understand that I’d probably do a better job with relationship-building content than an unknown writer on Upwork would.

I found the intersection between what I liked to do, what clients wanted, and what I could produce efficiently and well.

Lots of wise freelancers focus on robust topical ecosystems, like healthcare or law or technology. They stay up to speed, so they can write with authority on those topics. And they command fees that are significantly higher than a “jack of all trades” writer can.

Story element #5: your professionalism

This one is really old school … and really important.

When clients leave a query on your “Contact Us” form … do you get back to them? How long does it take you? Do you have a solid process to handle those inquiries?

Are you hitting your deadlines? Every time? Putting in as much thought and care for a client’s 50th piece with you as you did when you started working together?

Anyone who works with a lot of freelancers will tell you: Reliability is an issue. When clients find a writer who does what she says she’s going to do, every time, it makes a major impact.

Respond to client inquiries quickly. (This alone will make a significant difference in your revenue over a year.) Follow up. Manage your deadlines.

No bandwidth for new clients right now? Set up a quick waiting list on your site. Add a simple autoresponder to let them know you’ll connect as soon as you have the time to give them your full professional attention.

When you want to attract and retain wonderful clients, you need to take care of them like the treasures they are. It will get noticed.

Your writing can be seen as a commodity or as a valued service. The cool thing is — because you’re a professional wordsmith and you’re smart about marketing — you get to choose.


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